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March 2005

February 2005

Tough Beans!

Q: Why do my baked beans never seem to cook completely, no matter how long I leave them in the oven? Beans cooked in water that contains a high level of calcium can take a very long time to cook, or may never soften at all. The calcium combines with the pectins between cells in the beans. The strengthened pectins... Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


High Altitude Cooking

Q: What is high altitude cooking? Altitude cooking refers to the changes caused by differences in geographic elevation. The boiling point of water drops by about 2°F (1°C) for every 1,000 feet (300 meters) increase in altitude, above sea level. What that means in practical terms depends on what you are cooking. For example, if you are making candy, the... Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


Store-Bought Vinegar too "Wimpy"

Q:I find regular store-bought white vinegar to be too wimpy for my tastes. Is there anything I can do? Regular white vinegar is 5% acetic acid. You could try using pickling vinegar which comes in 7% concentration. You should be able to find it with the other vinegars in your grocery store. If you have food or cooking questions, send... Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


Ascorbic Acid

Q: I have an older cookbook that calls for ascorbic acid to be added to sugar syrup when freezing peaches. The local grocer doesn't have it and never heard of it. How come it's not available anymore? Ascorbic acid is used in recipes to reduce or prevent enzymatic browning of foods, particularly fruits. It should stil be available in most... Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


Chicken "Goop", Part II

In a comment on the earlier article Cooked Chicken "Goop", Alice wrote: I marinaded some chicken breasts the other day in a yogurt marinade (that I've made before with no ill results). My ingredients were all fresh (mostly yogurt, shallots, garlic, that kind of thing) and it looked whitish when I was done, as one would expect. I took the... Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


Cooked Chicken "Goop"

Q: Sometimes when I cook chicken, there is a white residue, kind of like cooked egg whites, that comes out. What is it and how can I avoid it happening? This happens frequently with grilled chicken breasts or kabobs. What you are seeing is protein from the meat, dissolved in water either from the meat or added during processing, which... Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


"Cheap Thrills" Recipe Comic Strip

I don't know why they call it Cheap Thrills, but have a look at this fun recipe comic strip. If you have food or cooking questions, send them to Questions@KitchenSavvy.com Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered. © Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


Seasoning Frying Pans

Q: What does it mean to 'season' a frying pan? How is it done? To season a frying pan means to treat it with oil so as to create a non-stick coating. This is usually done to cast iron pans. The oil fills any microscopic holes in the metal and then dries like a shellac, sealing the surface. Since Teflon... Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


Boiling Eggs without Cracking the Shells

Q: When I boil eggs, the shells crack. How can I prevent this? Here are a few things you might try in order to avoid having the shells crack when you boil eggs: Visually inspect the eggs before cooking. If possible, avoid using eggs with fine surface lines that may crack during cooking. Always discard eggs that are already cracked.... Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward