Baking

It all started with a plan to have Sloppy Joes for supper. For those not familiar, a Sloppy Joe is a mixture of ground beef in a tomato based sauce served in a hamburger bun. You can serve it sandwich style, which can be very messy, with the filling oozing out over everything, or as an open-face sandwich eaten with... Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


Why I Won't Ever Be a Mainstream Food Writer

Not that I have ever actually aspired to be a food writer for a mainstream newspaper or periodical, but occasionally I see an article that really brings home the truth that I could never cut it in that job. The most recent was an article just before Christmas in a national paper. It was a question from a reader who... Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


Why is Cream of Tartar So Expensive?

Why is Cream of Tartar so expensive? Can I make my own? - Alice Cream of Tartar (AKA tartaric acid, chemical formula KC4H5O6, Potassium bitartrate) is formed during the production of wines made from grapes. For commercial production the crystals that precipitate out in industrial fermentation vats are collected and purified into the white powder that you buy at the... Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


Water Needed for Large Quatities of Rice

When you cook larger quantities of rice, you need proportionally less water. Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


Time to Chill

Why do pie crust recipes tell you to refrigerate the dough before rolling it out? Refrigerating the dough after mixing has two main benefits. First, it cools down the fat, making it firm again. If the fat becomes too soft, it will mix too completely with the flour. Second, the resting period allows any gluten that was formed during mixing to relax. Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


"How do you measure flour after it is sifted? It would be so messy to then put it back into the measuring cup!" The easiest way to measure flour after sifting is to sift onto a piece of (waxed) paper and then use that to transfer the flour to a dry measuring cup. This is likely how your grandmother would have done it. Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


A Scalding Question

When a recipe calls for scalded milk, can you use skim milk or do you need to use whole milk? Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


As frequent readers will know, I went to the King Arthur Flour "Artisan Baking at Home" class this past fall. Since then I have been working to make the best baguette possible in a home oven. After tweaking the KA method, and adjusting the recipe for Robin Hood unbleached white flour, I think I have gone about as far as... Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


Pizzelle Puzzle

I have used self rising flour instead of all purpose flour for a pizzelle recipe that uses rum, orange extract, grated orange peel, unsalted butter, eggs, vanilla extract, sugar, flour and baking powder. What can I do to correct the taste before baking them? For those who haven't heard of them before, pizzelle are a Italian waffle cookie. They are cooked in an iron that impresses a lace pattern ... Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward


What Makes Double Acting Baking Powder Double Acting?

What Makes Double Acting Baking Powder Double Acting? Double acting baking powder is called that because it has two reactions, one at room temperature when the wet ingredients come into contact with it, and a second in the heat of the oven. To get the double acting part, two different powdered acids are typically used -- one for each reaction. Some people mistakenly think that because a batter increases in volume during cooking that this is means Read more →




Due to the volume of questions received, not all can be answered, nor can we guarantee we will answer questions immediately
© Lost Hobbit Enterprises 2004 onward